Why a Corporate Wellness Program Will Work for Your Company

July 27, 2018
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in Blog
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The success of any company depends on its people. And the ability of your workforce to perform at a high level consistently is supported by a positive workplace environment.  The B.Komplete Corporate Wellness Programs drive positivity, inclusion, and solutions for each company we work with.  The introduction of our Wellness Program has been successful and our results are beneficial for both the employee and the employer. Our Wellness Program takes a holistic approach to wellness, and focuses on the physical, mental and emotional wellbeing of the employees we service.

What is a Corporate Wellness Program?

Wellness is no longer a consideration solely for the self-funded company, but instead the solution sought out by all businesses, self-funded and fully insured.  As defined by the Center for Disease Control “workplace health programs are a coordinated and comprehensive set of health promotion and protection strategies implemented at the worksite that include programs, policies, benefits, environmental supports, and links to the surrounding community, designed to encourage the health and safety of all employees.”  A diverse range of benefits are offered under the label “workplace wellness,” from multi-component programs to single interventions, and benefits can be offered by employers directly, through a vendor, group health plans, or a combination of both.  It is no secret that health care costs have ranked among the top concerns of employers for more than the last decade. There is good reason for this concern – health care costs have outpaced inflation for years, and employers often bear the brunt of these costs.  Read more about on blog on “How to Select the Best Corporate Wellness Program for Your Company.”

If led and monitored correctly, a wellness program can not only save your company money, but can turn into an educational, social, and supportive addition to the workplace environment and culture.

The Top 5 Reasons Corporate Wellness Will Work for Your Company

  1. Driving Sustainable Behavior Change: Unhealthy behaviors lead to health risks and conditions, which ultimately leads to increased health care costs. A well-done, on-going corporate wellness program will identify unhealthy behaviors and help the group and individuals adopt and improve their behaviors and actions.  There will be follow-up, goal setting, customized solutions, and coaching along the way. 
  2. Reduction of Health Care Costs: One of the biggest reasons for a corporate wellness program is the reduction of health care costs. This does depend on the effectiveness of the program, and if done right, the savings from the participation in the program will be much greater than the actual cost of the program. A positive ROI (return on investment) means a far more productive and much happier workplace.
  3. Increased Worker Productivity: Poor Productivity at work, also known as “presenteeism,” means being at work physically, but not working efficiently. Interestingly, the cost of presenteeism is much higher than absenteeism. From numerous smoking breaks to distraction about health concerns, poor employee productivity has a negative impact on the business productivity and workplace culture. A well-done corporate wellness program can focus on improving this metric. 
  4. Improve Employee Retention: For businesses to thrive in today’s economy, finding and retaining the best employees is important. Benefits play a large role in employee retention, and employees want benefits personalized to their needs.  The cost of losing an employee can be high; Some studies (such as SHRM) predict that every time a business replaces a salaried employee, it costs 6 to 9 months’ salary on average. For a manager making $40,000 a year, that’s $20,000 to $30,000 in recruiting and training expenses.  Many employees love their corporate wellness programs and teams leading the events.  An excellent benefit to provide for your workforce are having ongoing wellness events – cooking demonstrations, office yoga, chair massage, coaching and more. 
  5. Improving Workplace Culture: Holistic wellness programs that inspire mindfulness, stress management, health and vitality in the participants yields a happy group of people – thus corporate culture will be improved.  When employers truly value their workforce, they acknowledge the importance of physical, mental and emotional health. A corporate wellness program should offer a variety of solutions to best meet the needs of each employee population, and inspire improvements in workplace culture.   

Whichever reason speaks to you – from reducing healthcare costs to improving company morale, the benefits of a wellness program are countless.  Here at B.Komplete we focus strongly on meeting and exceeding the needs of our Clients, and driving healthy and sustainable improvements in the employee population.  For more on corporate wellness please visit information about our programs. To schedule a complimentary consultation call to discuss a corporate wellness program for your group, please email us at info@bkomplete.com.

 

B.Educated, B.Inspired, B.Komplete


 

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What are Pre and Probiotics?

July 2, 2018
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in Blog
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Many of us have heard the word “probiotics.” In fact, many of us would even be able to associate probiotics with our gut or stomach. But what do they do? How do they help our stomach and digestion, and what the heck are prebiotics?

Probiotics are live bacterial cultures that help to keep our gut healthy.  Probiotics help with digestion, absorption of nutrients, and immune function.   Probiotics are found in fermented foods like kefir, kombucha, sauerkraut, pickles, miso, tempeh, natto, and kimchi.   Probiotics can also be found in dairy products such as yogurt.  One reason why we are encouraged to eat more yogurt, (how many of us have watched Activia commercials with Jamie Lee Curtis?) and certain soft, fermented cheese. Probiotics are now being manufactured into supplement form.  

Prebiotics are fiber, that basically work as a ‘fertilizer’ for the probiotics. Meaning, while the probiotics, or “good bacteria,” is working it’s way into the gut, prebiotics are helping the probiotics multiply, grow, and improve the amount of good bacteria in the gut. Interestingly, the body doesn’t digest prebiotics. It simply utilizes them to propagate probiotics in the digestive system.

Although both pre and probiotics work together to improve gut health, they are not found in the same foods. If you’re looking to add both to your diet without utilizing food sources, both can be found in supplement form.  However, the Registered Dietitian Nutritionists’ on the B.Komplete Team strongly recommend food first – before supplements.  Dietary supplements are not tested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration like medications. And the probiotic strains in the supplements may not be specific for the condition you’re looking to treat.  Always tell your Physician what you are doing that may affect your health, and schedule an appointment with a RDN on our team.

Foods Rich in Probiotics:

Yogurt: Yogurt is the number one source of probiotics. However, this only applies if the label specifically says “active live cultures.” Any pasteurization or sterilization can kill the bacteria and therefore there’s no good bacteria left.

Sauerkraut: Also known as lacto-fermented cabbage, and when unpasteurized, contains Lactobacillus bacteria (good bacteria). In this state, it actually contained more probiotics than yogurt.

Miso Soup: A very popular item on a Japanese restaurant menu, this soup is made with miso paste, an Asian seasoning made by fermenting a mixture of soybeans, barley, brown rice and several other grains with a fungus, Aspergillus oryzae.  Miso is a healthy, probiotic food that helps support digestion by adding beneficial microorganisms to your digestive tract.

Kefir: Similar to yogurt, there’s kefir, a fermented and cultured beverage, with a characteristic tart taste. For those with a dairy intolerance, kefir can be a good choice. Interestingly enough, a study done by Ohio State University, found that drinking kefir can reduce gas and bloating brought on by lactose consumption by almost 70%.

Pickles: Cucumbers that have been “pickled” in a solution of salt and water, using their own lactic acid bacteria, they are left to ferment, which turns them sour and a source of probiotics. Pickles are a good source of vitamin K too, although they are high in sodium, something to watch out for.

Foods Rich in Prebiotics:

Asparagus: Great source of prebiotics with roughly 5% fiber by weight.  Check out this delicious recipe for asparagus salad or this recipe for an asparagus frittata

Jerusalem Artichoke: Interestingly, Jerusalem artichoke has actually nothing to do with artichoke, with the exception of its heart’s flavor. Jerusalem artichoke is loaded with prebiotics as well as potassium and iron.  And, they are easy to prepare!

Bananas: A convenient food, that has fiber and potassium.  

Oats: Healthy grains with the added bonus of prebiotics. Oats contain beta-glucan fiber, which is what increases healthy gut bacteria, as well as antioxidants, which means they have anti-inflammatory effects.

Legumes:  Also great sources of protein and iron. Some common legumes include; lentils, kidneys, and chickpeas. Legumes have the right amount of fiber to boost healthy gut flora.

 

How much do you need?

At present, the verdict is out on exactly how much we need to consume, however some of the regulatory and scientific groups have put forward, per day figures of:

  • Dietary fiber: 25-38 grams

If you are not used to eating a diet that is rich in fiber, start slowly.  Try adding 1 new food each day for a week that provides a good source of fiber.  You can gradually increase each week.  

We truly hope this blog post was helpful, and inspires you to add a source of pre and/or probiotic fiber into your daily food plan.  Here at B.Komplete we believe in a healthy and balanced approach to eating.  Let us know in the comment section what you try!

B.Educated, B.Inspired, B.Komplete

References: 

http://ific.org/publications/factsheets/preprobioticsfs.cfm#Probiotics%20and%20Prebiotics%20Found%20in%20the%20Foods%20We%20Eat

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705355/

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