Her Motivational Moment

January 17, 2016
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Dana’s 2012 to 2015 transition

Dana is a young professional with a love for cooking and staying active. It didn’t start out that way – she didn’t always love to cook, or even know how to cook for that matter. Dana’s skills in the kitchen hovered just above knowing how to boil water. And her physical activity level was a far cry from a fitness enthusiast.

Back in 2012 Dana went to her Physician for her annual check-up. In her appointment she took a look at the height and weight chart that calculates your Body Mass Index (BMI). Dana calculated her BMI and was surprised that at her current weight she was considered overweight. She was surprised because “she didn’t feel that way,” but “couldn’t hide from the numbers.” Dana decided she had two choices, “live with it or make a change.” She decided to make changes and has successfully maintained a weight loss of 30 pounds for more than two years, gone from a size 8 to a size 2, lost 2 bra sizes and gained an entire new wardrobe! We asked Dana if she would share her experience with B.Komplete in an effort to help others in their quest for making healthy and sustainable lifestyle changes.

B.Komplete: When you decided to make changes in your life what was the first thing you did?

Dana: The moment I decided that I wanted to make changes in my life I took some time to reflect on my choices. I didn’t begin making lifestyle changes right away. I took about a week or two to “check myself” by asking questions such as, was I living up to my ideal life. I allowed time for self-awareness and assessment. I did a mental inventory of my life.

B.Komplete: How did you begin the physical process of changing your life?

Dana: I started running with my boyfriend. I wanted to spend more time doing activities together. In the beginning, I wasn’t able to keep up with his pace, “I was no speed demon.” But, wanting to spend time with him and being competitive helped to motivate me and work harder. My goal was to keep up with him on our runs. In the beginning it was difficult to keep up but I kept at it.

B.Komplete: What type of goals did you set for yourself?

Dana: I didn’t set a big goal like “I’m going to lose this much weight by this date.” I set small goals along the way. If I ran for ten minutes without stopping one day I would shoot for fifteen minutes the next day. I set small achievable goals and made small incremental gains that resulted in larger gains over time.

B.Komplete: What other changes did you make?

Dana: I did multiple things over a long period of time. I’m a “food nerd” so the thought of a restrictive diet was a worse case scenario for me. I began to learn how to cook. My weight was reflective of my lack of cooking skills. I learned a few simple things in the beginning to get started. I would choose recipes that were easier to make. Now, cooking has become a hobby for me. I have learned to cook many recipes from scratch. I view cooking as equally as important for sustaining my weight loss as I do the physical activity.

B.Komplete: Was there anyone in particular who helped motivate you?

Dana: Beryl and I were room-mates for a year.  I witnessed that she practices what she preaches for nutrition consumption and portion control.  Beryl’s recipes are well-balanced, from a nutrition and a flavor standpoint.  Beryl is always active, and supported me in my pursuit by joining me at my level as a reliable work-out buddy. As I began to change so did my relationships and conversations with other people. My conversations became more about health. I would ask my family questions about cooking which lead to more conversations geared toward health.

B.Komplete: Were your friends and family supportive of your efforts?

Dana: No one really noticed I was loosing weight until about a year after I began. Because I was making small changes over a long period of time I don’t think it was immediately noticeable. For the most part, people were supportive. But, sometimes they could make less than complimentary comments. I feel as though people sometimes feel a twinge of jealousy. It’s human nature to feel a bit jealous and have a lapse in support when someone else is accomplishing something you have not been successful in doing. It makes people look at themselves and reflect on their life and recognize their choices.

B.Komplete: What resources do you use to help keep you going?

Dana: I have a never-ending supply of healthy recipes and workout plans. Having these tools eliminates the excuse of not knowing what to do or what to cook. I like Cooking Light for recipes and Fitness Blender for exercise routines. I like Fitness blender because the trainers doing the workouts are not “just in their sports bras with their hair down.” They’re saying “wow, I’m sweating” and I’m thinking yeah, me too, I’m glad to know they are feeling the same way I do when I work out!

B.Komplete: Do you have a personal mantra or inspirational quote that you like?

Dana: I believe everyone needs one; mine is “yes you can.” On those days when I feel like my workout is to difficult I say to myself “yes you can.”

B.Komplete: What are you most proud of?

Dana: I’m proud of my life. I never set out with the goal of just losing weight. I wanted to increase my activity level and share more time with my boyfriend. As my activity level increased I began to lose weight. I have always liked me but now I like me even better. 

B.Komplete: What advice would you give to someone starting out on a similar quest?

 Start with small challenges that are achievable. If you hit a plateau push yourself to get through it. Be kind to yourself. I think people give up because they are too hard on themselves. Glitches happen, go back to your “mental buzzer” when you’re doing something that won’t help you reach your goal. If you make one “mistake,” don’t make two. Also, my activities became my hobbies. I stick with things I like which makes it easier to do. Find things you like to do. You need to have balance between physical activity and eating healthy in order to be successful.

B.Educated, B.Inspired, B.Komplete

 

 

 

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B.Komplete Explore the Store: Supermarket Series

January 4, 2016
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Come with us as we ‘explore the store’ in our quest to teach consumers the most nutritious and delicious ways to enjoy food products!  

Our focus in January is on Oil.  Did you know…

  • Safflower and Canola Oils have the lowest saturated fat content compared to other oils
  • Coconut Oil has the highest saturated fat content compared to other oils
  • Olive oil is far higher in monounsaturated fatty acids than any other fat or oil
  • Unsaturated fatty acids are thought to be better for your health than saturated fatty acids, with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated the ones to look for
  • You can make delicious salad dressing with avocado, walnut, grape-seed, sesame, flax and olive oils
  • You can cook with canola, sunflower, safflower, and coconut oils

We will be back next month exploring the Herb & Spice aisle.

Until next time, B.Inspired, B.Educated, B.Komplete

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10 Steps to the Happiest, Healthiest, and Safest Holiday Season for 2015

December 17, 2015
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What a year it has been!  As we all gear up for the December Holiday Season we at B.Komplete wanted to share with you our favorite tips for staying healthy and safe during the holidays, and all year round.  If you choose to use all 10, or pick 1-2 that work for you, please let us know how the tip has helped you! 

  • Savor Your Favorites
    • Scan the menu in advance and figure out which foods will provide you the most satisfaction to get the biggest enjoyment for the calories. Decide how much you can consume without overdoing it. If you enjoy appetizers or desserts select a few of your favorites to enjoy. Avoid mindlessly munching on foods that you aren’t crazy about.  When its time to enjoy your favorite food, eat it slowly.  Focus on all sensory aspects of the food.  Young woman enjoying a hot drink in winter
  • Live in the Moment
    • The holidays don’t have to be perfect or just like last year. As families change and grow, traditions and rituals often change also. Choose a few to hold on to, and be open to creating new ones. Focus on being present in the moment and focusing on the positives of right now. 
  • Plan Fun Exercise
    • Research has proven that if you enjoy exercise and think of it more like a fun activity you are more likely to do it, and also less likely to reward yourself with a food treat afterwards. Check out a new class at your gym, plan outdoor winter activities, take up a winter sport, or get creative at home – dance

theme-knolling-st-cergue-ski

 

  • Prune Your To-Do List
    • It’s really easy to let the to-do list pile up. And one sure fire way to reduce stress is to:  prune your to-do list. Ask, “If I don’t do this, what will happen?” Aim to knock down the list of “to-do” to the rock-bottom necessity.
  • Make a Budget
    • The American Psychological Association cited lack of time and money as biggest common stress producers for individuals during the holidays. Create a budget that works for you before the holidays start, and stick to it.  Check out Christmas Organized Home for some great resources and ideas on holiday budgets.  
  • Take a Breather
    • Make some time for yourself. Spending just 15 minutes alone, without distractions, may refresh you enough to handle everything you need to do. Even Oprah does this! Find something that reduces stress by clearing your mind, slowing your breathing and restoring inner calm.  Some options may include:  Taking a walk at night and stargazing, listening to soothing music, getting a massage, or reading a book.

person-woman-relaxation-girl

  • Lighten Up Recipes
    • GREATIST has the greatest, healthy ideas.
    • The American Diabetes Association provides useful tips on how to enjoy and keep it healthy.
    • The team at Joy Bauer has some helpful tips to keep your holidays healthy: 

Creamy Cheesecake Pudding with Strawberries

  • Happily Hydrate
    • Water may very well help keep your metabolism moving. And it is no secret that if you are dehydrated you are going to feel lousy.  Get extra water through broth based soups, decaffeinated tea, fruits and vegetables.  And enhance your water with citrus, cucumber, or berries.  
  • Rest Well
    • A good night’s rest can help your cognitive function, concentration skills, mood, and boost your immune function. Trouble sleeping?  The National Sleep Foundation provides helpful tips to give you a restful nights’ slumber. 
  • Laugh Often
    • Studies show that humor and happiness are associated with the ability to enhance our immune function, decrease our risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. Schedule time for activities that make you laugh such as watching a funny movie or television show or spending more time with that one friend who makes you laugh.  There are many really funny videos on You Tube that only take a minute to watch, and can make you laugh to hard you have a positive outlook for the next hour.  

Happy young family sitting and talking on sofa

 

B.Educated, B.Inspired, B.Komplete

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Business Lunch Hour – A Healthy Addition to Your Work-Day?

October 28, 2015
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It’s 11:00 AM and your stomach starts to growl – do you know where your lunch is?

The business lunch manifests itself in many ways:  the quick lunch, the working lunch, the networking lunch with coworkers, the job interview lunch, or the lunch-with-your-boss lunch!  Whatever type you follow, we recommend making sure it’s a true and healthy break from your busy day.

There are countless benefits of breaking from work for lunch; reducing stress, increasing concentration, sustained energy for your afternoon, feeling better, and many more.  However, unhealthy food choices and overeating can greatly hinder, if not cancel out, those positive results.  By including better-for-you food and beverage choices and being mindful while eating, you can boost the positive benefits and fuel your body to get you through the rest of your workday with energy and vitality.

Mindful eating is a skill that takes practice.  Mindful eating means: avoiding emotional food decisions and distractions at meal time.  When we eat “mindlessly” we are not present during our mealtime, which can lead to weight gain and health problems.  Don’t let emotions, stress, or deadlines sway your ability to maintain healthy eating habits during a busy work day.  Practice being present and enjoy a breather, savor each bite, and come back to work recharged.

4 B.Komplete Tips for Your Mindful and Healthy Business Lunch:

  1. When eating out, research the restaurant ahead of time. Most restaurants have online menus  available for perusal.  You can check out Healthy Dining Finder  to find healthy dining options in your area.  Another tool to use is Calorie King which reveals the nutritional content of many foods.  By figuring out your meal ahead of time, you can avoid the risk of impulse ordering. 

     More tips for eating out – Restaurant dining can pinch your wallet and your waistline – choose wisely:

  • Order the smallest size available
  • Choose to drink water, unsweetened tea, or club soda
  • Request that the bread/chips be brought out with your meal, or avoid altogether
  • Ask for dressing on the side
  • Ask for light sauce or sauce on the side
  • Choose grilled, baked, poached, or steamed proteins
  • Aim to make a meal out of a salad and additional protein
  • Share your appetizer, salad, entrée and/or dessert
  • Use lemon, olive oil, and/or vinegar to flavor

 

 

  1. Drink a big glass of water before you start your lunch break. Research has shown that drinking about 16 oz. of water prior to a meal  can help you avoid temptations like dipping into the endless bread or chips offered at many restaurants.  Additionally, thirst and hunger triggers come from the same part of your brain, meaning that while you may feel hungry, you are in fact thirsty.  Drinking water 15 minutes before eating  can help curb your cravings and encourage eating less at meal time.
  1. Pack your lunch the night before. Your work day is busy enough.  Avoid a hectic morning and try packing your lunch the night before when you’ve had a chance to decompress and can make mindful decisions.  Have you heard about “salad in a jar” – it’s a solution for a healthy, custom, and delicious grab-and-go option.
  1. When eating with others, remember to savor. It’s easy to get distracted by office chatter when networking with colleagues.  Eating becomes so automatic that you may look down at your plate and notice your food is already gone.  Savor each bite (for example, notice the texture of the food in your mouth or identify the different sweet, salty, sour, and spicy flavors as you chew) as if it were your last, to help avoid problems like overeating.

 

There are many reasons to take a lunch break  and keep it sacred.  This is so important that we’ve even mentioned it before in a previous post.  Remember that lunch can be delicious and healthy.  Schedule a daily break for yourself  to refresh your mind and feed your belly.  We promise your body and your company will thank you for it!

 

B.Educated, B.Inspired, B.Komplete!

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Savory Ancient Grain Recipe

September 12, 2015
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Looking for a healthier version of a comfort dish? The Ancient Grain Millet is perfect to use in place of any simple carbohydrate (white rice, bread or pasta). Millet will take on the flavors that you add. Try out this B.Komplete Savory Millet Stuffing recipe:

1 TBSP Buttery Spread (Smart Balance)
1/2 Medium White Onion, Diced
1 Medium Sweet Bell Pepper, Diced
2 Celery Stalks, Diced
2 CUPS Millet, Uncooked
4.4 CUPS Low Sodium Broth (Veg or Chicken)
2 Bay Leaves

Heat a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the buttery spread, allow to melt and coat the pan. Add the vegetables and the uncooked millet, and coat in the melted spread. Allow to lightly brown. Add the bay leaves. Gradually add the broth, 0.5 cups at a time. Allow to absorb, stir, then add more broth.

Serves: 6 – 8
Cook Time: ~30 minutes

B.Educated, B.Inspired, B.Komplete!

          B.Komplete Millet Pilaf

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HOW TO START A VEGETARIAN DIET – ARE YOU UP FOR THE CHALLENGE?

August 25, 2015
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Woman thinking over how to become a vegetarian

Type “becoming a vegetarian” into your favorite search engine and you are guaranteed to see a plethora of news articles, medical journals, lifestyle blogs, and social media sites filled with suggestions.  Let’s keep it simple – condensed results for you in an easy-to-follow article:

First, let’s review the benefits.  Switching to a vegetarian lifestyle can help improve personal health , sustain the environment, support animal welfare, and save money.  Whatever you believe, there is always a reason to consider trying a vegetarian diet.

If you’re reading this, then you may have thought about becoming a vegetarian at one time.  For whatever reason you couldn’t start then, we challenge you to take the venture now!  Vegetarianism is more accessible than ever, even for the busy professional. 

Here are four steps to make it happen:

Step 1 – Let’s be honest…

Before skydiving for the first time, would you calmly hop in your car and drive to the nearest airport?  Probably not; you may consider a few things like risk, personal health and cost, prior to jumping.  Similarly, if you want to become a vegetarian, consider the following:

  1. What foods do you enjoy and what don’t you like?
  2. Are you an adventurous eater or do you to stick with what you know?
  3. Do you eat in restaurants or at home?
  4. Do you cook or buy ready-to-eat meals?

Understanding your preferences will help make this work.  For example, don’t expect to become a vegan chef overnight if you don’t like cooking.  You may enjoy some ready-to-eat options instead while you ease yourself into cooking a few meals. 

Step 2 – What do you know?

There are different types of vegetarianism.  Here are the most popular:

  • “No food with a face” – Quoted from TV character Phoebe Buffay of Friends , this type of vegetarian avoids food with a face, or simply put animal meat. The technical name is lacto-ovo vegetarian, which includes eating animal byproducts like dairy and eggs, but not the animal flesh itself. 
  • One fish, two fish… – A pescatarian fuses the health benefits of fresh fish with nutrient rich plant-based foods. A pescatarian avoids all land animals like beef and poultry and may also exclude byproducts like eggs and dairy.
  • Animal hugger – Also known as vegan. This version completely omits animal product from the diet including byproducts like eggs, dairy, honey, and foods with Red40 coloring. 
  • What the heck is a flexitarian? – A newer term, the flexitarian  consumes meat less frequently and in smaller amounts. For example, a flexitarian  may eat plant-based foods only, but will eat meat on special occasions like holidays.

Which one sounds good?  Choose the best fit for you and set it as your goal.

Woman pointing out produce and vegetable options in grocery store to a man.

Step 3 – Let’s eat!

Enough thinking, let’s start eating! 

  • Tip 1 – Make your favorite already-vegetarian dishes:

Do you like sandwiches like grilled cheese and PB&J, veggie lasagna , rice and beans , tossed green salads and other potato, pasta and fruit salads, minestrone soup, or mac ‘n cheese?  If you do, good news!  These are already meat-free dishes!  

  • Tip 2 – Embrace “gateway” meat products:

While some people turn their noses up at the processed nature of faux meats, this option can be an efficient way to add protein and make a meaty dish vegetarian without losing the flavor and texture of the dish.  These products can be found in most grocery store chains, in the natural food and frozen food isles:

For more healthful vegetarian products, check out our previous post.

  • Tip 3 – Substitutions for Vegan-friendly dishes

Avoid dairy and eggs by using plant-based ingredients instead.  Items like applesauce, bananas, nut milks, flax seed, and coconut can be substituted while cooking and baking.  In addition to great taste, your foods may be healthier!  Check out conversion charts available online.

Step 4 – Nice to meet you!

To be a successful vegetarian, introduce yourself to new meals and ingredients.  Plant-based dishes can be delicious, easy to find, and healthy.

Take the Challenge

Starting a vegetarian diet can be easy to do, and can be a gradual process.  It’s helpful to have a support system in friends and family. 

To help you get started, we challenge you to take the 3-day B.Komplete Vegetarian Challenge!  All you need to do is try three breakfasts, lunches, snacks and dinners that fall within the type of vegetarian you want to become.  Use the recipe sources in this post or stick to your already vegetarian favorites.  Then, let us know how you did by leaving a comment below! 

Not willing to commit yet?  Try out Meatless Monday.  A now global movement, this  organization encourages people to “once a week, cut the meat.”  Their website has a vault of resources to help you commit to reducing overall consumption of meat.

keep calm vegetarians

Resources for you:

Vegetarianism and Sustainability – http://www.businessinsider.com/reasons-to-go-vegetarian-in-charts-2013-10

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics – http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/curious-about-vegetarianism

Animal Welfare – http://www.peta.org/

Money Saving Tips – http://www.nomeatathlete.com/save-money-vegetarian/

Pescatarianism – http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/start-pescatarian-diet-9760.html

Vegan Diets – http://health.usnews.com/best-diet/vegan-diet

Flexitarianism – http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-blog/flexitarian/bgp-20056276

Recipe sources – http://allrecipes.com, http://www.marthastewart.com, http://www.vegkitchen.com, and http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/search/vegetarian

Meatless Mondays – http://www.meatlessmonday.com/

Vegetarian Asian Blend

                 Vegan Asian Blend – Made with Tempeh

 

B.inspired, B.educated, B.Komplete!

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Organic versus Conventional – Which Should You Choose?

July 9, 2015
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PART TWO

Lets continue the conversation on some of the main factors that consumers like you consider when making purchases at the food store. If you didn’t read Part 1 of the series addressing the safety and cost of organic and conventional foods, you can view it here.

 Nutrition

Working to improve your health through the food that you eat? Then you want to eat the MOST nutritious versions available, right? It’s more bang for your buck!  The food & nutrition industry has been testing both organic and conventional foods for many years. Unfortunately, there hasn’t been a definitive answer of which type is nutritiously superior.  In the early 2000’s, you could find articles that were claiming a significant nutritional disparity between select organic and conventional foods. Only a few years later, there had been new research saying the exact opposite. In 2009, the American Society of Nutrition posted an article  concluding there is no significant difference between organic and conventional foods. Again in 2012, a hotly debated report from Stanford University stated that there is a lack of strong evidence that organic foods are more nutritious than conventional foods.

 Today’s research deviates from those studies, showing that there IS a nutritional difference in some organic foods. Reports are showing up to 40% higher in antioxidant activity  in organic fruits and vegetables. Antioxidants are comprised of nutrients like Vitamin C, carotenoids, flavonoids and minerals like selenium and the health benefits of antioxidants are evident.

 What does this mean? It’s apparent that there is more research needed.

 If good health is important to you, then we suggest continuing to choose your favorites until further solid evidence is discovered. Want better nutrition now? Remember VARIETY! Eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low fat meats and dairy will give you a wide spectrum of your daily needed nutrients.

anti-oxidants

Environmental Impact

Soil erosion, decline in crop production, fertilizer runoff, and pesticide resistance are concerns that some take into account when deciding between organic or conventional foods. The USDA has many resources on how farmers can protect and enhance the environment but there are still problems that worry shoppers.

 Scary reports of lake and river “dead zones” occasionally surface after finding considerable deterioration of wildlife and vegetation. This fuels new environmental studies to identify the true offender and will often include testing of new farming techniques and products that can help protect instead of harm.

Consider this: all types of farming impacts the surrounding environment. Organic farms can use natural fertilizers and pesticides that can cause runoff problems. However, the USDA says that organic farming differs from conventional farming because they strive to preserve natural resources and biodiversity with their farming techniques. There also are organizations like the Rodale Institute in Pennsylvania that dedicate themselves to researching and testing better ways for American farmers to grow organic foods without harming the environment.

If preserving the environment is important to you, then you may want to consider choosing organic foods. Environment-friendly tip: buy local! As we mentioned in Part 1, think about supporting smaller farms that are local to your home or workplace. This reduces the need to truck food products all over the country, which can produce a considerable amount of fossil fuel emissions.

 Don’t know where to find a local farmer market? Visit here and input your zip code or download an app for your mobile device (we tried Farmstand).

 

FreshProduce at a local farm stand

So, what should YOU choose?

The bottom line is that, as a consumer, you have to decide what’s important to you. Whether you’re concerned with safety, cost, nutrition, environmental impact or something else that wasn’t mentioned, you should always choose what’s best for you and your family. Watch for new research on the areas that are important to you. And in the meantime, purchase and eat healthy food that you love!

Your Resources

For the Organic 101 series provided by the USDA – http://blogs.usda.gov/tag/organic-101/

Antioxidant Health Benefits – http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/antioxidants/

Market Search: http://search.ams.usda.gov/farmersmarkets/

Farmstand App: https://www.farmstandapp.com

B.inspired, B.educated, B.Komplete!

 Photo Credit:

http://abcn.ca/category/diet-exercise/

http://farmersmarketannex.com/fmablog/?p=271

 

 

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Organic versus Conventional – Which Should You Choose?

June 29, 2015
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organic-vs-conventional-640

Deception. Misdirection. Imminent Danger. All characteristics of a villain in the next superhero blockbuster, not the emotions we should have when selecting our next meals.

 With sensational headlines in modern media and new research claims, it’s not surprising that even the most educated shopper can be infused with doubt over what to place in the cart. Shopping at the market should be a pleasant experience filled with delicious options from which to choose.

 Today, there is a wide variety of conventional and organic produce (fruit, vegetables), livestock (meat, dairy, eggs) and multi-ingredient products (breads, pasta, and other processed foods). This is a great success for the US, but it can be very overwhelming for the American consumer.

 Common complications:

  1. We can be inundated with so many choices that it may seem easier to select what was purchased before, without thinking twice.
  2. Organic foods are stigmatized, with some saying that they’re only for the wealthy, for environmentalists, or for parents with young children.
  3. Some food companies have embraced misleading marketing practices to boost sales, touting that their foods are “healthy and natural” or even using “organic” on their packaging. (Other companies are responding to these practices by putting out product lists of their own, encouraging transparency in marketing and making healthy, informed choices.)

 Choosing between organic and conventional foods can be an easier decision. In this two-part series, we’ll address some factors that consumers like you consider when making purchases at the store.

Safety

A concern for some shoppers is safety – safety for themselves, for farmers, or for the animals. Understanding the production of both conventional and organic foods can clear up some apprehension.

 Conventional food products are produced by traditional farming practices used by small family farmers to large corporate farms. This can include using chemical pesticides for pest control and synthetic fertilizers to increase growth margins. For livestock, this includes dosing with antibiotics and hormones to help maintain the health of the animals.

 Governing organizations like the USDA and FDA regulate conventional farming practices and inspect food products for wholesomeness, deeming them as safe for consumption. However, government regulation ends there.

 According to the USDA,  organic operations must use only approved substances and avoid man-made fertilizers, prohibited pesticides, and genetically modified organisms. These practices also promote farm worker health, lowering the risk of inhalation or ingestion of harmful substances.  Furthermore, the USDA organic seal on meat, eggs, and dairy products verifies that producers met animal health and welfare standards, did not use antibiotics or growth hormones, and provided animals with access to the outdoors.

 If safety is your priority, then organic foods may be the best choice. On the fence? Start with the Environmental Workers Group’s “Clean 15” and “Dirty Dozen,”  an annual list distributed to educate consumers on pesticide residues on fruits and vegetables.

Cost

One of the key benefits of conventional food products is their wide spread availability in the US. These products can be found in grocery stores, convenience stores, and schools, to name a few. Simple economics of supply and demand as well as generous government subsidies help explain the lower prices of conventional foods.

organic operations chart

Typically, organic foods are priced higher than conventionally grown foods, which may be caused by the limited availability of organics. America has seen a significant increase of organic operations since 2002 however, so consumers may begin to see reduced prices on certain foods. 

 Consider also the additional fees to the farmers. Farm owners have to pay fees and complete a transition period  before beginning organic operations. To recoup these expenses, additional costs may be incorporated into food prices. Paired with “high-end” public perception and premium upcharges, organic foods will often be more costly than their conventional counterparts.

 If you are concerned about cost, then conventional foods may be best. Still like to buy some organic? Here are some money saving tips:  

  1. Purchase discounted organic “seconds” at your local markets when available. 
  2. Visit local farmers who may follow organic practices but save on operational costs by avoiding the USDA certification process. A few specific questions to the farmer may help save you some money.  eat local

 Don’t know where to find a local farmer market? Visit here and input your zip code or download an app for your mobile device (we tried Farmstand).

 Check back for Part Two of Organic vs. Conventional – What should you choose? We’ll discuss the Nutrition and Environmental Impact of Organic and Conventional foods.

 Resources for you

 

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Pass the Pineapple

June 23, 2015
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pineapple drink

Pass the pineapple! Not only is pineapple a delicious way to get vitamin C and manganese, pineapple provides bromelain which reduces harmful inflammation.  Whether you are looking for a well-balanced smoothie, or a guilt-free cocktail, pineapple is the perfect ingredient to use.  

The B.Komplete Tropical Green Smoothie Recipe:
1/2 cup chopped pineapple
1 ripe banana
1 handful fresh spinach
1 scoop vanilla protein powder
1 tablespoon ground flaxseed
1/2 plain yogurt (I like Greek)
1/2 – 3/4 cup water (per your consistency preference)
Blend and enjoy!

Easy Pina Colada (via Joy Bauer )
1 1/2 cups frozen pineapple chunks
3/4 cup canned light coconut milk
3 – 5 ice cubes
2 tablespoons shredded coconut
1 shot of run (optional)
Blend and enjoy!

 

 

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Memorial Day: Eat Right for Your Life

May 21, 2015
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Whether you will be hosting or attending the party, there is no doubt food will be a central part of the celebration. Among friends and family, traditional holiday fare and other favorites, you think to yourself ‘there is no way, healthy fits in with Memorial Day’. No need to worry anymore, follow these healthy tips with the following great recipes to help you enjoy the holiday – guilt free!

cilantro-lime-shrimp-kebabs

Go Lean on the Grill.  Enjoy lean meats and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Cilantro Lime Shrimp Kebabs

Grilled Salmon Kebabs

Grilled Pesto Chicken & Tomato Kebabs

Jamaican BBQ Pork Tenderloin

Grilled Chicken with Herbs

Veggie Kabobs

Grilled Pineapple

Grilled Peaches with Honey and Yogurt

Ginger-Marinated Grilled Portobello Burger

Grilled Fennel with Parmesan & Lemon

Grilled Garlic Artichokes

buffalo-wings

Recipe Makeover. Enjoy the favorites among family and friends with a healthy twist.

Skinny Buffalo Wings

Jicama Apple Slaw Recipe

Deviled Eggs

Baby Red Potato Salad

No-Shell Taco Salad Recipe

Light Artichoke Dip

Lightened Up Mac n Cheese Bites

Santa-Fe-Black-Bean-Salad

Find Your Healthy Options. The easiest way to fight the temptation is by snacking on the foods that are naturally lighter.

Shrimp Ceviche Cocktail

Edamame Hummus

Bruschetta with Tomato & Basil

Mango, Avocado, & Black Bean Salad

Zesty Lime Shrimp Avocado Salad

Southwestern Black Bean Salsa

Brie, Apple, & Arugula Quesadilla

Black Bean Burger

Red Potato Salad with Green Beans and Tomato

Enjoy the time with your family and friends, and have a wonderful holiday.

 B.inspired, B.educated, B.Komplete!

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